Magazines, Travel and Middlebrow Culture in Canada 1925-1960

Leslie Gordon Barnard

Contents (click to go directly to a section)

Biographical link

Bibliography

Editorial commentary

Additional biographical note


Biographical link

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/leslie-gordon-barnard/

Bibliography

The Excise Officer. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Mar/Apr. 1911: 13+ [available at Canadiana Online http://eco.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.8_06735_8/2 ; http://eco.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.8_06735_9/1 ]

Shadows. Short story. Maclean's 15 Mar. 1920: 16+

Mrs. Moore Entertains. Short story. Maclean's 1 July 1920: 22+

Cash and Carrie. Macleans 15 Nov 1920: 34+

First Row - Orchestra. Macleans 1 Dec 1920: 20+

Matilda - Flapper. Short story. Canadian Home Journal. Aug. 1920

The Song of Loo Foy. Short story. Maclean's 1 Feb. 1925: 26-27, 40, 42, 44

Snow in Spring. Short story. Maclean's 1 June 1925: 16-17, 75-77

Son of the President. Short story. Maclean's 1 Nov. 1926: 12+

Marie-Louise. Short story. Maclean's 1 Mar. 1927: 12+

September. Short story. Maclean's 1 Aug. 1927: 16+

Payment. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Apr. 1928: 3-5, 96-7

Where No Ships Pass. Two-part story. Canadian Home Journal Oct. and Nov. 1928: 3-5, 97;  13-15, 81

Camberley’s Bride. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Apr. 1929: 16-17, 37-8

Rizzie's Uncle Jordan. Short story. Maclean's 15 June 1929: 4+

Mr. Pinadeck's Day. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Feb. 1930

"Passengers Must Be on Board by Midnight". Short story. Maclean's 15 Apr. 1930: 10+

Mr. Welland has a Bad Day. Short story. Maclean's 1 Oct. 1930: 12+

Christmas for Holly. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Dec. 1930: 8+

Exit to Music. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Mar. 1931: 14+

Beyond the Rim. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Apr. 1931: 10+

The Two-Man Girl. Short story. Maclean's 15 Oct. 1931: 18+

Midnight Miracle. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Dec. 1931: 16+

Guard of Honour. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Nov. 1932: 12-13, 42-3

Miracles for Sale. Short story. Maclean's 1 Dec. 1932: 16+

Voices Off-Stage. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Apr. 1933: 12-13, 32-4, 34b

Day of Departure. Short story. Maclean's 15 Apr. 1933: 16+

Miss Medway’s Dull Day. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Aug. 1933: 10-11, 45, 47, 52

The Company of Fools. Short story. Maclean's 1 Aug. 1933: 18+

Michael Meets the Family. Short story. Chatelaine Aug. 1933: 16+

Jancis. Serial (Novel). Canadian Home Journal Sept, Oct., Nov., Dec. 1933 and Jan., Feb. 1934: 6+; 12+; 14+; 11+; 19+; 12+

Strawberry Picnic. Short story. Maclean's 1 Sept. 1933: 18+

Folly for Two. Short story. Maclean's 15 Nov. 1933: 10+

Breach of Etiquette. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Sept. 1934: 10-11, 30, 32, 34, 36

Stormy Birthday. Short story. Chatelaine Oct. 1934: 14+

Men in Mufti. Short story. Chatelaine Nov. 1934. 14+

Green Teacups. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Nov. 1934: 7-8, 31-4

Headlines for Peter. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Jan. 1935: 18+

Supper at Mr. Rodgers's. Short story. Chatelaine Apr. 1935. 16+

Water From The Jordan. Short story. Canadian Home Journal July 1935: 18+

Seldon Square. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Oct. 1935: 18+

Cotton Cargo. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Jan. 1936: 7+

Beyond Paradise. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Apr. 1936: 10+

She Bows To Brains. Short story. Canadian Home Journal June 1936: 5+

Scandal Runs on Wheels. Short story. Chatelaine Oct. 1936: 7+

Two Minutes Silence. Short story. Macleans 1 Nov. 1936: 15+

The Wooing of Kathie O’Toole. Short story. Maclean's 15 Nov. 1936: 33+

The Fugitive. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Jan. 1937: 5+

Outpost of Empire. Short story. Canadian Home Journal May 1937: 24-5, 32, 34, 36

Two Men And A Girl. Short story. Canadian Home Journal June 1937: 14

The Little Man. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Oct. 1937: 14-15, 86

Sound Trumpets. Short story. Chatelaine Nov. 1937: 14-15, 53

A Ghost From Eden. Short story. Canadian Home Journal July 1938: 5+

The Winter Road. Serial Novel. Canadian Home Journal Nov. and Dec. 1938, Jan., Feb., Mar. and Apr., May and June 1939: 8-11, 26-7, 74, 77-8, 81-2, 87; 14-16, 58-9, 64, 68, 72, 75, 80-1; 12-14, 30, 32, 36; 12-14, 62-3, 78; 10-12, 26, 45-6, 59-61, 64-6, 69-70, 82-3; 14-15, 27, 30-1, 34, 49-51, 74-6; 11-13, 44, 67, 69, 71-2, 88-90; [pages unknown]

Wyndham’s First Case. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Jan. 1940: 5-7, 19, 21-3, 28

The Lady Guesses Wrong. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Feb. 1940: 12+

Wyndham Gives Absent Treatment. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Mar. 1940: 12-13, 20, 23-6

The Case of the Mad Major. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Apr. 1940: 14-15, 57, 70-73, 96-7, 99

The Girl At The Snack Bar. Short story. Canadian Home Journal June 1940: 14-15, 22-5, 35-7, 42

The House Next Door. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Oct. 1940: 8-9, 24, 26, 28-30, 32

Wings For Miss Sprott. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Nov. 1940: 5-7, 22, 24-6

The House of Graham. Two-part story. Canadian Home Journal Apr. and May 1941: 6+; 12+

This Might Be Murder. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Aug. 1942: 8+

Waterfront Girl. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Sept. 1942: 10+

Girls Are Like That. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Oct. 1942: 8+

Scandal in Seldon Square. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Nov. 1942: 14+

There is No Fear in Love. Two-part story. Canadian Home Journal Jan. and Feb. 1943: 10+; 12+

The Case of the Fat Fisherman. Short story. Canadian Home Journal June 1945: 14-15, 26, 28, 35-7

[with Margaret E. Barnard] I’ve Got To Tell You Darling. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Feb. 1950: 12+

Successor to Laura. Short story. Canadian Home Journal June 1951: 16, 85-92

[with Margaret E. Barnard] You're Very Young, Mrs. Barry. Short story. Chatelaine Mar. 1953: 18

[with Margaret E. Barnard] So Wide the Sea. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Apr. 1953: 20+

Portrait of Cousin Dennis. Short story. Mayfair Oct. 1953: 38+

[with Margaret E. Barnard] Christmas At Home. Short story. Chatelaine Dec. 1954: 20

The Threatening Storm. Short story. Chatelaine Oct. 1954: 22

Holiday Eve. Short story. Canadian Home Journal May 1955: 10+

Journey Back to Love. Short story. Chatelaine Apr. 1956: 16

Editorial commentary

‘Leslie Gordon Barnard, whose “Son of the President” appears in this issue, is one of the number of younger Canadian authors who are building up a reputation, not only in this country, but in the United States and England as well. His work is appearing regularly in those publications which pride themselves on the quality of their fiction rather than the quantity. But, as is the case with many Canadian writers who are now known internationally, MacLean's is his first love. As he puts it: “I always feel more than usually satisfied when a yarn of mine appears in our own magazine.”’ (In the Editor's Confidence. Editorial. Maclean's 1 Nov. 1926: 96)

‘“Interference” [written by Roland Pertwee] ends this issue! Everybody who has followed this great mystery story will register regret at this, we know! Fortunately, the supply of good mystery stories does not end here, for the Canadian Home Journal has been most fortunate in securing several others. This month it is to be a two-part story, “Where no Ships Pass,” and it is written by a very successful Canadian short story writer, Leslie Gordon Barnard of Montreal. – A strange tale of unknown people in an unknown place – a flight of imagination that pictures things real, makes them live and holds the reader tense with interest.’ (Editorial. Canadian Home Journal Oct. 1928: 112)

‘Leslie Gordon Barnard, who wrote the story about Michael on page sixteen, is one of Canada’s most brilliant writers, and has just brought out a book of short stories.  He has a happy faculty of making stories of very simple, ordinary things that might happen to anybody, in almost any home.’ (Byrne Hope Sanders, Editorial for Chatelaine Aug. 1933: 2)

‘If you study Al Parker’s very lovely drawings on pages ten and eleven, you will notice that a good, solid pillar comes between George and “Tommy” Witherspoon. This is strangely symbolic, because at the moment they are working up a first-class row that is going to culminate with the departure of Husband Witherspoon vowing that if his young wife will smile at other men, he will retaliate by picking up the first girl he meets. Fortunately, everybody in the story is under the guidance of Leslie Gordon Barnard, also of Montreal, whose touch in matters of this kind if exceedingly skilful.’ (In the Editor’s Confidence. Editorial. Maclean’s 15 Nov. 1933: 2)

‘A word about the fiction offering. To bring Warwick Deeping, Leslie Gordon Barnard, Jack Paterson, Virginia Coyne Knight, Jessie McEwen and Franklin Davey McDowell together in one issue gives no small measure of satisfaction, for it answers very definitely a question asked by a Canadian writer just a few days ago, “Does a writer have to be an American to get into Canadian magazines?” for five of the writers whose stories we offer are Canadian, resident in Canada, while the sixth, Warwick Deeping, is, of course, well known as one of England’s master writers. It is our confident belief that their offering will prove equal in every way to the best.’ (Our November Offering. Editorial. Canadian Home Journal Nov. 1934: 2)

‘All critics will agree that Leslie Gordon Barnard, of Montreal, is one of Canada's finest fiction writers.  His ‘Supper at Mr. Rodgers’s’ is intensely human.  Nothing violently exciting happens - only a supper party with a man and his mother.  Yet that evening made Lina Dixon understand life as most of us have to face it.  See if you don't recognize much of what you've learned yourself in this story.’ (Byrne Hope Sanders, Editorial for Chatelaine Apr. 1935: 4)

‘With this, the first issue of the New Year, 1936, CANADIAN HOME JOURNAL hails the publication in book form by Macmillans of Canada of Leslie Gordon Barnard’s story, Jancis. Our readers will remember that Jancis ran as a serial in the JOURNAL from September, 1933, to February, 1934, and that it was beautifully illustrated by Rex Woods, one of whose drawings is used as the cover design for the book. This is something of which we are justly proud. We want whenever we possibly can to use the work of Canadian authors, believing that there is something which Canadian authors have to contribute to the general deposit of thought set down in English when they write sincerely. Jancis was a story which did not follow any of the usual story lines. It was inward; it was predominantly artistic and it had to do almost entirely with the drama that went on in the soul of a man, John Laveris, when he fell in love with a young girl called Jancis. Laveris was a Hamlet kind of a man. He thought a long time before he could take decisive action about anything. He was so overpowered by the spiritual sense of things and the ecstasy it produced in his own fibres that he dallied too long in the contemplation of Jancis and allowed her to be forced into a marriage without love by Claude, a primitive type of young man who was a farmed on the banks of the St. Lawrence. The story has a lovely tone and a mystic tone. It has as its background the great river of Canada and the sense of its story lies all around the narrative, giving us a feeling about the St. Lawrence which is akin to the feeling European writers have given to the romantic rivers of Europe. We sincerely felt when Jancis was featured in CANADIAN HOME JOURNAL from month by month that this was Canadian literature. Our own familiar territory used as a background for an intense drama of souls. The story has something of the same strange quality as was found in Maria Chapdelaine, except that it dealt with sophisticates brought into impact against simplicity.

           It is our sincere hope that in these days when there is a sincere effort being made to promote a genuine interest in Canadian literature that the people of Canada will tender Jancis a kind and whole-hearted reception. Incidentally, Cotton Cargo, a gripping tale of the sea and the opening story of this issue, brings together the author of Jancis, Leslie Gordon Barnard, and that master of pictures of the sea, Anton Otto Fischer, whose work is winning friends everywhere. (Editorial. Canadian Home Journal Jan. 1936: n.p.)

‘Armistice Day again darkened by the shadow of Mars provides the theme for Leslie Gordon Barnard’s short story on page fifteen – “Two Minutes Silence.”

          Its presentation, too, is shadowed. For the illustration accompanying it was yet on the drawing board when, without warning, death came to E. J, Dinsmore ...’ (In the Editor’s Confidence. Maclean’s 1 Nov. 1936: 2)

‘One of our Canadian writers, Leslie Gordon Barnard, has been for two years writing a novel. We had a look at its first chapter two years ago, and ever since we have been sitting on the Barnard doorstep waiting for the delivery. We never in those two years took our editorial eyes off Leslie Gordon Barnard, for we are rather given, as you will have noticed from time to time, to making prophecies. The Winter Road we literally tore out of the arms of its creators for our winter serial. It is, we believe, one of the greatest pieces of writing that has ever come from Canada. It is profoundly sincere and a story of people battered by emotion and pushed around by economic storms, just as you are and we are. Its first instalment begins with month on page 8.’ (Editorial. Canadian Home Journal Nov. 1938: n.p.)

‘And “The Winter Road,” from the pen of one of Canada’s leading authors, Leslie Gordon Barnard, fills a big place in this issue – and not only because of our good opinion of the story, but because of the whole-hearted reception given to it by our readers. Many, many letters are out evidence of that acceptance.’ (Editorial. Canadian Home Journal Mar. 1939: 86)


Additional biographical note

Leslie Gordon Barnard's wife, Margaret Barnard, also wrote short stories for Chatelaine and Canadian Home Journal:

Bateau From St. Luce. Short story. Chatelaine Mar. 1933: 10

Each in His Own Time. Short Story. Chatelaine July 1934: 18

Water Rat. Short story. Chatelaine June 1947: 18

There’s Always George. Short story. Chatelaine Nov. 1947: 17

When Do We Start Living? Short story. Chatelaine Aug. 1948: 8

The Wacky Bunch. Short story. Canadian Home Journal Aug. 1957: 31

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